Impacts of conventional and diversified rotation systems on crop yields, profitability, soil functions and environmental quality

Project ID: 
E2010-02
Project Description: 
This project is a continuation of a previously funded grant that compared the agronomic, ecological and economic effects of conventional and low external input cropping systems. It focuses on measurements of nitrate leaching, greenhouse gas emissions from soil, carbon sequestration, and soil organic matter transformations, especially those related to nitrogen availability to crops. For this effort, the soybean and corn plots have been split to allow side-by-side comparisons of genetically engineered and non-genetically engineered hybrids and varieties.
Project Location: 
Boone
Years of Grant Project: 
3
Total Grant Amt: 
90182
Program(s): 
Date: 
2010
Lead Investigator: 
Matt Liebman
Lead Investigator Affiliation: 
ISU Agronomy
Lead Investigator Email: 
Lead Investigator Bio: 

Matt Liebman is professor of agronomy and the Henry A. Wallace Endowed Chair for Sustainable Agriculture at Iowa State University. He was one of the founding members of ISU's Graduate Program in Sustainable Agriculture and served as that program's chair from 2004 through 2007. He has a B.A. in biological sciences from Harvard University and a Ph.D. in botany from the University of California-Berkeley.

Lead Investigator Image: 
Co-investigator(s): 
Craig Chase, Leopold Center, Tom Sauer, USDA-ARS, Mark Tomer, USDA-ARS, Michelle Wander, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Abstract: 

Comparisons were made among contrasting cropping systems within a long-term, large-scale field experiment in Boone County, Iowa. Combining crop diversity with lower herbicide inputs and non-transgenic crops was effective in reducing requirements for nitrogen fertilizer; maintaining or improving weed suppression, grain yields, and profi ts; and increasing several soil quality indicators.

Key Question: 

How do cropping system diversity and contrasting technology packages of crop genetics and herbicide inputs affect agrichemical use, crop performance, weeds, soil quality and function and profitability?

Answer: 

Comparisons were made among contrasting cropping systems within a long-term, large-scale field experiment in Boone County, Iowa. Combining crop diversity with lower herbicide inputs and non-transgenic crops was effective in reducing
requirements for nitrogen fertilizer; maintaining or improving weed suppression,
grain yields, and profits; and increasing several soil quality indicators.

PDF Long Report: 
PDF Short Report: 
Completion Year: 
2012
No Report: 
Quarter: 
4
Special Project: 
Staff Notes: 
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